ARMY,  Learning Korean

Learning Korean

 

Fan translators translate nearly everything, from tweets to lyrics to interviews. Bighit usually translates most music videos and VLive content is usually translated within a few days of it being posted. In summary, It is not required that you learn Korean to appreciate BTS. Many ARMYs still decide to learn Korean in order to learn more about Korean culture and easily understand them.

Here are some resources and methods that have free content to help you learn Korean.

How and Where to Start?

The Korean language is often intimidating to a lot of people because of its unique alphabet that was created specifically for Koreans. If you are here, that means you are very interested in trying to learn and hopefully, in the future, understand this beautiful language.

Here is the link to an interesting video that should ease you into the process of learning.

Tips from a Beginner

I’m sharing these pieces of information with you so that no one gets lost at the beginning.

The first tip I’m going to give you is: do not be discouraged by the amount of unfamiliar material that you will suddenly be introduced to. Feeling scared and overwhelmed is completely fine and a normal reaction, but just keep going and stay determined. You will succeed in no time!

Tip number two is more about your dedication to the language. You need to be willing to sit down every day and study. The only difference between studying for school and studying alone is that you enjoy learning new things on your own. It makes you feel like you are spending your time wisely.

Tip number three is to not stop when you see it’s getting harder. That’s the bridge you need to cross in order to get where you want to be. There is no magic formula to solve this problem.

Tip number four makes you think about your schedule. Make plans ahead to make sure your time is well used. On Sunday night decide which lessons and vocabulary you will learn that week and then on the next Sunday quiz yourself and repeat the process.

And lastly, tip number five, you necessarily don’t need a dictionary to start studying since internet is full of material, but it would be much easier to use for some of the methods I provided down below.

Methods

Websites

I recommend using sites on the internet that take you step by step through your Korean journey.

Talk To Me In Korean is the best website for beginners with an easygoing curriculum. You will learn a lot but further you go in, you will find yourself lacking material.

Then I would use How To  Learn Korean which has a lot of vocabulary and provides with grammar which is explained in depths.

Reading

This is where the frustration sets in because you recognize the alphabet but pronunciation is hard and everything seems difficult to understand.

Now you are asking what do you gain from it besides tears? You are familiarizing your brain to adapt to the Korean language. In order to make it easier for later, you need to force yourself to read in Korean. Use Naver or Daum for articles about BTS. They are easy to read once you gain a grasp of it because the same information is circling around.

Webtoons are also a great source for Korean vocabulary. You can choose either Naver or Daum Webtoons.

Journaling

I would never think of journaling as something that could help me at learning since I’m not used to it. This idea was introduced to me by Sun Hyun-woo, founder of TTMIK.

It’s quite easy, but I also found it a bit frustrating. As a writer, I need to have my thoughts on the paper but it’s hard when you don’t even know the fraction of the language you are writing in.

If we don’t pay attention to my frustration, I recommend this method because it will make you search for new vocabulary and sentence patterns.

Of course, this doesn’t have to be written in a notebook. You can practice Korean anywhere on social media, but the best way would be the old way. You are familiarizing yourself with the completely new alphabet which means the practice for making Korean blocks is needed.

Here is what Sun Hyun-woo has to say about it.

Study Groups

Even if you can’t study along with someone you know in real life, there are many ways to connect with other people learning Korean, especially ARMY’s. It is easy to find Discord Servers or Amino Groups by simply googling “Discord Servers for Learning Korean”, etc. It is a great way to practice conversational speaking and share tips.

Youtube

If you don’t have a Korean friend who will pronounce everything you need, use Youtube as the main source for pronunciation. There are really amazing channels led by native Koreans with really good English skills. Grammar is explained in a really simple and fun way. Every new word is accompanied by a sample sentence which is an awesome way to see how it’s used. They also provide Korean slang and phrases which Koreans use the most. Sometimes there are entertainment videos published where they show you some interesting stuff about culture.

 Korean Unnie

The girl who dropped her job to become a full-time Youtuber. She has a very vibrant personality that just makes you learn. This channel provides:

  • 3 playlists with over 100 lessons each
  • entertainment videos like Korea tour, her radio show etc.
  • live video every WED at 11am KST
  • learning with K-pop lyrics (BTS, Blackpink)

Minji Teaches Korean

Another very passionate girl with extremely good English who enjoys sharing her native language with others. This channel provides:

  • Korean Like A Native
  • Korean Culture and Travel
  • Korean Word Master
  • Easy Korean Patterns
  • 10 seconds Korean

Apps

Lingodeer

Available through: Apple App Store, Google Play Store

Pros:

  • Great for learning vocabulary and grammar.
  • It instructs you on how to draw the characters as you learn them.

Cons:

Talk to Me in Korean

Available through: Apple App Store, Web Browser

Pros:

  • There is a large and very thorough amount of material available for free.

Cons:

HiNative

Available through: Apple App Store, Google Play Store, Web Browser

Pros:

  • it can be a great supplement to language learning. It allows you to connect with native speakers of the language so that you can ask questions about pronunciation, spelling, context, etc, which you cannot do on most other apps.

Cons:

  • HiNative is not meant to be a primary form of learning a language; it does not offer course materials.

Memrise

Available Though: Apple App Store, Google Play Store, Web browser

Pros:

  • Start with current, everyday vocabulary and learn through reading and listening games
  • Speak like a local by recording and comparing your pronunciation with theirs
  • Improve your grammar with their grammarbot and learn how to form useful sentences
  • Put your skills into practice with chatbots

Cons:

  • You will need a Memrise subscription in order to have access to full courses and features. Courses available may vary depending on the language of your device.

Duolingo

Available through: Apple App Store, Google Play Store, Web browser

Pros:

  • Good for learning vocabulary.

Cons:

  • You can’t access much material on the grammar on the app versions.
  • There is not much instruction on how to properly write the characters.
  • It is becoming increasingly dominated by paid content.

You lack the motivation to start?

Here, I’ll show you something.

bts

You want to understand whenever they speak so let these 7 beautiful people be your inspiration. Whenever you feel frustrated about not understanding, sit down and study. Determination is the key here.

Hello! I'm Paula. I live in Croatia, Europe. Currently a student at Medical School. Even tho I'm an Army for only half a year, I dedicated my time to BTS and this website. I also like to read and write a lot. I lose my free time on TV shows and anime.

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